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Archive for July, 2012

I have the ability to read poetry from all corners of the world, Africa, India, and weird ass places like Florida and forgotten northern towns of California. I wouldn’t trade that for anything. As much as I complain about it, it’s truly a gift that I am allowed this.

The following issue has some really strong poems that, by themselves, stand alone as great pieces of testimonial art; but together they paint an amazing worldly portrait, as most of the poetry issues do–if, by chance, you haven’t noticed.

Poets are everywhere, fortunately or unfortunately. Now, the true task of the poet is to paint the truth (motherfucker shoulda been a painter then, huh?!) in such a way that its nakedness startles us; its rawness disgusts or offends; its remarkable accuracy enrages us; and if that doesn’t work, the poet should lie to us so well that we, in turn, applaud his or her malicious and honed skills.

Luis Rivas,
Henry Ajumeze
Poetry Editors

won’t someone think of the janitors
By Leeroy Berlin

i can only imagine that joe wasn’t pleased

exactly

about how it went down

i know that was his favourite picture of

himself with that tranny hooker

off the five

he had framed on the walls

not a bad looking girl

i think they might be related (more…)

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Some of the best autobiographies (Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt and Wild Swans by Jung Chang, for example) are by people whose greatest claim to fame is the very writing of that autobiography. The less well-known the person is beforehand, the more need there is for the work to be interesting in its own right. By contrast, autobiographies by people who are already famous often turn out to be incredibly dull or self-serving – or both! (more…)

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Memoirist, blogger, and soon-to-be clinical psychologist Rodica Mihailis has undergone many personal evolutions since her defection from communist Romania in 1981. Her recent memoir, The Gypsy Saw Two Lives (Strategic Book Publishing), itself evolved from her popular blog, chronicles the adaptations that have characterized her life on both sides of the Atlantic with humor and perspective—and a surprising amount of empathy even for the least sympathetic characters. In this fifth edition of “The New Xорошо,” Mihailis expounds upon faith, free will, and the funny side of being ousted from an ambulance in February; under separate cover, Colman O Criodain reviews The Gypsy Saw Two Lives.~T.M. De Vos

(more…)

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