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Archive for September, 2009

Casey Mensing: Gipsy thoughts under the moon of longing and desire

 

Short Biography

Casey Mensing was born in a town called, Breese. His family was the restless sort, so he’s lived a few other places since then. Currently, he’s residing in Honolulu, HI.  Mr. Mensing started out as a compulsive liar but switched to writing after discovering the works of Frederico Garcia Lorca and Lightnin’ Hopkins, which is why Casey describes his poetry as a blend of Duende and Mojo Hand. You can read selections of Casey’s newest writings at http://caseymensing.blogspot.com.

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#107 Prose

Scarecrow

Luke A. Thompson

So we hired this scarecrow. Yincent. My sister saw the ad in the Cambrian News and said ‘Is he for real?’ so I called him up to see. We met in the afternoon and in the evening I called him again to say the job was his. This was Sunday. I showed him the plot and we watched at the kitchen window so he could see the birds he was meant to scare. He took it all in, but I could see his hands shake. I said ‘Are you nervous?’ He said he had Essential Tremors and he probably drank too much, but the shaking helped his work. ‘Makes you look real,’ he said. Before dawn every morning I let the cat out, and I see Yincent setting up. I think it’s nice he’s there and I wave, and he waves.

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#107 – Poetry

Poetry by John Grochalski, Vera J. Lee, BL Pawelek, Spiel, Constance Stadler, Joanna M. Weston, Stephen Williams, Yassen Vasilev, and Fredrick Zydek.

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Paradise by Elise
Masque Publishing, 2009
To purchase, visit the Masque Publishing website.

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Poets can express a lot in few words and a little in a lot of words … Since the first kind appeals most to my mind most poetry I will appreciate is short, to the point, brief, concise and preferably with wit or irony. But to quote R.M. Engelhardt on this matter: ‘there is still so much more to say’ … And for once, or twice, I must agree with him. Fire and Rain Vol. I by Raindog Armstrong proves it. Be it a pearl of a poem, be it a good poem, what matters is what is said, the images invoked, the thoughts of one who observes society from his own, rather exceptional, perpective, … A world of ideas is brought to you, worthy to be read, familiar to some, and a journey, a discovery for most in the mind of an outsider. Not only a journey through the mind, but also in time and mentality as the book (Vol I and II) covers Raindogs’ best work from 1993 to 2007. Interesting to say the least, exceptional to say the most. I can only recommend a book of poetry like this, maybe a bit less focused on form, but all the more interesting and thoughtprovoking in content. Few poets will be able to present a collection of 15 years of poetry in a similar qualitative collection, combining it’s own sense of beauty in expression and especially the evolving ideas from an outsider on a specific era in time.


For more information on RD Armstrong visit:

http://www.lummoxpress.com
http://www.myspace.com/poetraindog/
http://livinginthetimeofheroes.wordpress.com/
http://www.facenews.org/category/nonfiction/
http://www.thenervousbreakdown.com

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The Rainbow’s End #3

Peter Ristuccia: where many styles converge …

Short bio

Peter Ristuccia graduated from the University of Georgia with a B/A in History. He performs commentary on Georgia Public Broadcasting, the local NPR affiliate. His writing can be found on http://www.PeterRistuccia.com. He lives in Atlanta with his wife and three children.

 
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#106 – Poetry

New poetry by Spike Daeley, Michael Estabrook, Aimee DeLong, A.J. Kaufmann, Melissa Lee-Houghton, Alvin Park, Frank Reardon, Elizabeth Kate Switaj, and A.g. Synclair.

 

A.g. Synclair
Entering Paxton

a lone Waxwing
greets me from atop
an ageless stone wall
fallow
among brushwood
slough
and floret

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Gonzo Cupboard #3

In GC’s latest Gonzo supplement, Luis Rivas reflects on his first poetry reading in the big city and Stalinophile Richard Nesberg offers some Cold War-era flash fiction. (Greg Oguss)

Luis Rivas
Escape to San Francisco

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#105 – Poetry


“Untend” by Jeff Crouch
Adam Hughes
Upon Hearing a Train

I heard a train last night, a little
after one. Its coyote-call
whistle conjured up vagrants
and sojourners riding
in empty boxcars, cattle-catchers
on the front of locomotives,
and the commemorative caboose
in Sugar Grove – a museum
that no one visits.

But upon hearing the nocturnal
call of freight in transit
I’m left with the feeling that deep
thoughts about locomotives do not make me an engineer.

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Welcome one and all to the inaugural Roundtable, where we the Gloom Cupboard Editorial Team chew over various pressing matters. On the panel today we have Dorla Moorehouse (DM), Greg Oguss (GO), Jude Dillon (JD), Lena Vanelslander (LV), Richard Wink (RW) and Stuart Sharp (SS).

Let’s Get Down to Business: What are your opinions on the Current State of the Small Press?


(GO): I don’t know enough about small presses to comment on their health. But their inherent obstacles to making an impact have probably never been greater. Two years ago, I was telling a friend that a risqué short story I considered my “best stuff” had never been published. She answered, “The best stuff never is.” Whether or not my story was any good, I think this suggests the role that the small presses and little magazines used to play: as a ‘publisher of last resort.’ They often printed odd things overlooked by bigger presses, giving the material some small chance of rising (or falling) on its merits. Now, blogs have usurped this function, making certain that nearly everything gets some sort of public airing via personal websites, which frequently have a larger readership than many small presses. If small presses are to stick around, which I’m not sure they will, I think tough questions have to be answered that are confounding all “content providers” these days.

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